Monthly Archives: April 2015

The acreage of Aqaurius

MCCARTNEY Real Estate Torquay will auction, unless sold prior, a fantastic acreage property situated in one of the most sort after and tightly held areas in Torquay.

Torquay Heights offers the best of both worlds, peaceful rural living while only minutes from Torquay’s heart and wonderful beaches.

This well laid out property is already set up for the horse lover with multiple individual paddocks, new fencing, tack room, loads of water storage and an abundance of shedding.

Alternatively, if you want a spacious property which is close to schools both existing and planned, sporting facilities and is a two-minute drive to the beach, then your search may be over.

McCartney’s John McMahon said the sale was a rare opportunity to purchase a lifestyle return on investment.

“With the nearby Torquay North development precinct well under way, and possible sub-division opportunities within Torquay Heights, this property would be a wise investment decision,” Mr McMahon said.

The very comfortable solid brick veneer residence home has a large family/dining/kitchen area, three good-sized bedrooms all with built-in robes, main bathroom, separate toilet and additional spacious rumpus room ideal for older siblings or somewhere to retreat.

There is a very relaxing outdoor area off the main living area that is complemented by an in-ground solar-heated swimming pool, making this a real lifestyle proposition.

Sub-division is a reality in the area.

The land lends itself to myriad different options, subject to council approval, if you wanted to create a separate parcel, immediately or in the future.

Being on the north side of Torquay, the property has direct access to Geelong and the newly constructed ring road making Melbourne only a little over an hour away.

Unless sold prior, the auction of this spacious property will take place at 1pm on Saturday April 18.

For more information or to arrange an inspection, phone John McMahon on 0400 866 634 or Dom Gleeson on 0438 911 037.

Mattress problems put to bed

TRYING to find a way to dispose of a mattress in an environmentally friendly way can be a daunting task, but a new automated processing plant offers a solution to the problem. Thanks to the TIC Mattress Recycling Plant, Geelong and Surf Coast residents will be among the first to use the new system set to transform the industry, with an exclusive mattress recycling offer on the table for April.

The new facility reduces the manual handling and deconstruction of mattresses dramatically, and enables an increased recovery of valuable resources such as steel, foam and textiles while reducing health hazards and the risk of workplace injuries.

Managing director of TIC Mattress Recycling Michael Warren said two years of research and development had gone into the new facility.

“Mattresses have long been recognised as an environmental problem. If they are sent to landfill they are bulky, take up a lot of space, and the recyclable steel and other materials are lost,” he said.

Since 2013, TIC has completed a global search and sent Australian mattresses to Europe for testing in automated facilities. The chosen technology has been modified for Australian conditions and will be capable of processing more than 20,000 mattresses a year, thereby saving about 170,000 cubic metres of landfill space and recycling more than two million kilograms of steel, and 250,000 kilograms of foam.

Warren said TIC was committed to providing a long-term sustainable solution to mattress recycling.

To find out about the offer for Geelong and Surf Coast residents, contact 1300 230 768 or email mattressrecycling@ticgroup.com.au.

For more information about the new automated system and to see a video of the process visit ticgroup.com.au/mattress-recycling.

Revised council plan released for feedback

THE Surf Coast Shire has made a number of changes to the strategic document that is guiding its The council plan 2013-17 has undergone a midterm review, and councillors at their meeting on Tuesday resolved to place the draft revised plan on Shire mayor Margot Smith said the review had resulted in some adjustments but not wholesale changes to some strategies and measures to make them more meaningful and we’ve introduced three overarching priorities to direct the council’s work in the second half of its These three priorities are: the environment, the economy and the community partners plan remain the same: environment, governance, communities, infrastructure, and, growth and Perhaps the biggest changes are in the had two strategies – explore opportunities for carbon farming with the carbon offset scheme throughout the shire, and activate seven measures to achieve this, such as an increase in expenditure allocated to recycled materials used in road maintenance and construction, and the percentage of Several of the measures have been adopted in “working with the community to reduce emissions, explore alternative energy opportunities and adapt The new council plan also contains a strategic resource plan, which makes a number of forecasts about council spending every year until These comprise the council’s income statement, To read the draft revised council plan or make submissions, head to surfcoast.vic.gov.au

Funding queries set mood for shire budget

THE Surf Coast Shire has kept a wary eye on future funding in its draft 2015-16 budget, which was released for public comment last week.

The council has raised rates by 5.5 per cent (including the municipal charge) – higher than the 4.75 per cent increase in the previous charged in 2013-14.

Surf Coast mayor Margot Smith said the increase partially but not totally covered the three-year freeze in federal government grant funding, which would result in a $255,000 shortfall each year.

She said there was also uncertainty about a number of state and federal grant programs.

the state government’s proposal to cap rates at the consumer price index from July 1, 2016 was not factored into the budget, but the policy was concerning.

“If rates were two per cent less, it’s not just that year, we would lose $720,000 a year forever; so it accumulates very quickly and becomes a.The budget includes $18.2 million in capital works spending (up $2.4 million on 2014-15).

There is $8.2 million to fund 45 new projects and facility upgrades, such as $1.4 million for a second oval in Torquay North and $1.46 million for the next stage of the Anglesea existing roads and facilities, including $1.4 million on resealing local roads; and more than $1 million in new community projects and initiatives.

The Surf Coast Shire will also spend the next six months consulting with the community as part of a review of the council’s long-term projects.

Cr Smith said this did not mean the council was backing away from its $28 million plan to build an aquatic centre in Torquay, but was community about how funds should be raised and used.

There will be community sessions about the budget held in Lorne, Torquay, Anglesea and week.

To read the draft budget, make a submission head to surfcoast.vic.gov.au.

Winchelsea from next

SWEET DEAL

THE future is sweet for a chocolaterie in Bellbrae, with the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) granting a planning permit for the project last month.

Based on a similar venture in the Yarra Valley, the Great Ocean Road Chocolaterie and Ice Creamery will produce high-quality chocolate products and ice cream within highly DEAL landscaped grounds.

The six-hectare site at 15 Elkington Road is expected to become a tourist destination in its own right, will be open every day of the year except Christmas Day, and will have parking for more than 200 cars.

The project will create 57 full-time equivalent jobs, including six qualified chocolatiers, with its chocolate sourced from Belgium and all other produce to be grown or bought locally.

According to the report considered by the shire’s planning committee, it is also proposed that the chocolatiers will provide training to local workers, as there are no chocolatier training courses in Australia.

The Surf Coast Shire issued a permit in October last year for the chocolaterie, but the decision was referred to VCAT soon afterwards.

A mediation hearing between applicant Carolyn Grills-Harte and others and respondent Chocolate Destinations Surf Coast Pty Ltd was held in Melbourne on March 6.

In the hearing, before VCAT member SR Cimino, the two parties confirmed they had reached agreement about the plans, and that a permit for the chocolaterie could be issued subject to a number of conditions.

The new conditions are largely identical to the Surf Coast Shire’s original permit.

The appearance of the site from the outside will change slightly, with a 1.5-metre high earthen bund to be built along the east boundary and a 1.8-metre high timber paling fence to be built to the east and north of the car parking area.

Other modified conditions include the entry and exit of service and delivery vehicles, external lighting, the level of background and patron noise, and the hours of operation.

Premium opportunity in old Torquay

49 Price Street, TORQUAY

49 Price Street, TORQUAY

49 Price Street, TORQUAY

Auction: Saturday March 23 at 11.00am

This has to be one of the best opportunities in old Torquay for 2013. A large four bedroom home with three living areas, two bathrooms, superb ocean views and a massive block of approximately 1200sqm – the possibilities are endless.

The home is in original but fantastic condition and would make the perfect holiday home, family home or investment. Knock down and subdivide (STCA) or keep it and reside, it’s up to you.

This is the first time this home has been offered for sale, and a chance not to be missed!


Hayden Real Estate, Torquay
Inspect by appointment
Ben Smith 0423 050 825
Bryan Hayden 0417 613 250

News of our demise greatly exaggerated

Local print media

Local media is an integral part of the tourism conversation.

Journalists may occasionally be accused of sensationalising aspects of a story to increase its punch.

This is evident in early coverage of the restructures and job losses at Fairfax and News Limited, which has led to an impression that news print media is on its death bed.

With apologies to Mark Twain – the reports of our death have been greatly exaggerated.

Last week, this paper spoke with advertising doyen and executive chairman of Aegis Media Pacific, Harold Mitchell – who reiterated a point he made in a couple of columns he wrote for The Age.

He said that regional media is thriving, strong and of great value and importance to the communities it serves.

“It seems that in the frenzy to proclaim the death of the newspaper, many national commentators are blind to the truth in ‘the bush’ where most of the money is made and in the ‘burbs’ where the people live,” he wrote in “Buffett sends message with a thumbnail dipped in ink” – The Age, June 29, 2012.

He highlighted famed US investor Warren Buffett’s recent purchase of 63 country and regional newspapers for $US142 million, and quoted Mr Buffett who said “In towns and cities where there is a strong sense of community, there is no more important institution than the local paper”.

In conversation with this paper, Mr Mitchell spoke of a number of strengths possessed by regional papers, the most pertinent of which was tourism. He said that within the next 10 years, tourism will become more important to Australia and its economy than mining is today.

Geelong Otway Tourism executive director Roger Grant strongly agreed with Mr Mitchell’s sentiments and identified local media as an integral part of the tourism conversation.

“I think the relationship between, in particular tourism and local media, is indeed very strong,” he said.

“We don’t get cut through messaging in the bigger papers, so local media is very important to get tourism messages out there. Tourism needs an open dialogue and that discussion doesn’t take place if you remove the local media.”

Mr Grant said that within a rapidly changing tourism environment – one that he said generates $2.1 billion annually for the region – local papers are important in keeping even those in the industry informed of new events that pop up across the region.

“It is critical that local media has a strong voice,” he said.

Furthermore, while many commentators were discussing the possibility of a government subsidised print media for the bigger city-based papers, the state government were committing to increase their advertising spend per campaign from 10 to 15 per cent in regional papers.

The Coalition Government said it will more actively engage regional and rural media outlets to communicate critical information to their local community. To that end, they have committed to better support regional media through a new policy (Regional Communication Policy) which will see government advertisers increase their expenditure in regional media outlets.

Deputy Premier and Minister for Regional and Rural Development Peter Ryan joined Member for Benalla Bill Sykes last week to announce details of the policy.

“From the smallest media outlets to the largest, all play an important role in connecting our local communities and that is better reflected in this new policy,” Mr Ryan said.

“The updated policy, which will take effect on 1 July, requires government advertisers to increase expenditure in regional media outlets from 10 per cent to 15 per cent of their total campaign spend.

“There is an obligation for each government department to report annually on the actual spend in regional media, which will be audited by the Department of Premier and Cabinet. This will ensure small and independent newspapers are included where appropriate.”

Mr Ryan said changes to the demographic profile of the state and developments in technology and new media led the government to conduct a review of the existing policy.

“The policy was informed by analysis with media experts and stakeholders and through consultation with editors and owners of regional media, including at a Regional Communication Forum, held in Moe in December last year,” Mr Ryan said.

“There are no other regional communication policies in existence in Australia. The Coalition Government intends to continue consultation with regional media as part of an ongoing process, to keep regional communities connected and engaged.”

Within Victoria, those in government, advertising and regional media agree with Warren Buffett’s sentiment that there is “no more important institution than the local paper”.

Harold Mitchell certainly does.

“He’s (Mr Buffett) right and also it’s true here. Newsprint is dead? I don’t think so.”

More to mission than stamina alone

Zeb Walsh

Jan Juc’s Zeb Walsh with Pete from Soul Fuel – united in their mission to help SIDS research through River’s Gift.

Jan Juc waterman Zeb Walsh is about to set off for Hawaii to contest his second Molokai to Oahu Paddleboard World Championships, but this time around his mission has even more meaning.

Last November, close friends Karl and Alex Waddell tragically lost their baby son River to SIDS, and – as a father himself – the news hit Walsh hard, spurring him to help raise awareness and funds for research.

“As soon as it happened, I wanted to do something. People think what I’m doing is hard, but what they’re going through every day is harder.”

Walsh is calling on the Surf Coast to help him raise funds for River’s Gift, a local foundation to drive SIDS research and hopefully lead to its prevention.

“SIDS is just such an unknown, but if I can raise some money, hopefully the foundation won’t have to exist in the future.”

Last year Walsh clocked just over five hours, 45 minutes for the 32-mile (almost 52km) open ocean race that crosses the infamous Channel of Bones, and landed fourth place in the 12-foot stock division. But with extra training this year, and several impressive results over summer, he told the Surf Coast Times and Bellarine Times that he felt a lot stronger, fitter and more confident in the lead up to the July 29 event.

“The last hour and a half really hurts, but the Hawaiian guys say that’s when the race really begins. And at the five mile mark, the top guys really start to shine. My aim is to get faster toward the end, but it is a fight.”

Walsh said there were a lot of good paddlers over there, including Hawaiian George Ramos who has competed in every Molokai to Oahu since the event’s conception 15 years ago.

“If I could do half as many as George has, I’d be stoked. The Molokai is definitely something I want to keep doing, and this is not my last.”

Soul Fuel in Torquay have donated a $100 voucher to support Zeb’s fundraising efforts, so to go in the draw to win, follow Zeb’s mission and get behind River’s Gift head to fromvicotomolokai.blogspot.com.au.

Relaying the good news

The final figures are in and they reveal Surf Coast and Bellarine inaugural Relay for Life fundraisers netted nearly $140,000 for the Cancer Council of Victoria.

Held in early November, the events proved a resounding success for the region. The Surf Coast Relay for Life raised $93,047 at the Bob Pettit Reserve, whilst the Bellarine event collected $49,135 at the Collendina Recreation Reserve in Ocean Grove.

So successful was the Surf Coast event that it has already necessitated a move to another venue. Surf Coast Relay for Life chairman Darrel Brewin said six new teams have already indicated they will participate this year, taking the numbers to 29, with even more teams expected from other Surf Coast centres, including Anglesea.

“With more than 500 participants in the inaugural event, the committee felt this year’s event should move to a larger venue,” Mr Brewin said.

“We will move to Torquay’s Spring Creek Reserve for the relay on the weekend of November 10-11.

“The committee is thrilled to achieve a result of more than $90,000 and we are particularly pleased to have raised awareness about cancer in our community.”

Chairperson of the Bellarine Relay for Life volunteer committee Sue Berry said she was overwhelmed by the community support the event received.

“It’s the first time we’ve held the event so we didn’t really know what to expect, so to raise in excess of $45,000 is amazing. People just kept coming throughout the day and night, supporting their friends or simply supporting the event and the fight against cancer.

“We’ve booked Collendina Reserve again for the second weekend in November. Fourteen teams have already registered for the 2012 event and anyone can register online if they wish.”

People can register for both events online at www.relayforlife.com.au.

News of our demise greatly exaggerated

Local print media

Local media is an integral part of the tourism conversation.

Journalists may occasionally be accused of sensationalising aspects of a story to increase its punch.

This is evident in early coverage of the restructures and job losses at Fairfax and News Limited, which has led to an impression that news print media is on its death bed.

With apologies to Mark Twain – the reports of our death have been greatly exaggerated.

Last week, this paper spoke with advertising doyen and executive chairman of Aegis Media Pacific, Harold Mitchell – who reiterated a point he made in a couple of columns he wrote for The Age.

He said that regional media is thriving, strong and of great value and importance to the communities it serves.

“It seems that in the frenzy to proclaim the death of the newspaper, many national commentators are blind to the truth in ‘the bush’ where most of the money is made and in the ‘burbs’ where the people live,” he wrote in “Buffett sends message with a thumbnail dipped in ink” – The Age, June 29, 2012.

He highlighted famed US investor Warren Buffett’s recent purchase of 63 country and regional newspapers for $US142 million, and quoted Mr Buffett who said “In towns and cities where there is a strong sense of community, there is no more important institution than the local paper”.

In conversation with this paper, Mr Mitchell spoke of a number of strengths possessed by regional papers, the most pertinent of which was tourism. He said that within the next 10 years, tourism will become more important to Australia and its economy than mining is today.

Geelong Otway Tourism executive director Roger Grant strongly agreed with Mr Mitchell’s sentiments and identified local media as an integral part of the tourism conversation.

“I think the relationship between, in particular tourism and local media, is indeed very strong,” he said.

“We don’t get cut through messaging in the bigger papers, so local media is very important to get tourism messages out there. Tourism needs an open dialogue and that discussion doesn’t take place if you remove the local media.”

Mr Grant said that within a rapidly changing tourism environment – one that he said generates $2.1 billion annually for the region – local papers are important in keeping even those in the industry informed of new events that pop up across the region.

“It is critical that local media has a strong voice,” he said.

Furthermore, while many commentators were discussing the possibility of a government subsidised print media for the bigger city-based papers, the state government were committing to increase their advertising spend per campaign from 10 to 15 per cent in regional papers.

The Coalition Government said it will more actively engage regional and rural media outlets to communicate critical information to their local community. To that end, they have committed to better support regional media through a new policy (Regional Communication Policy) which will see government advertisers increase their expenditure in regional media outlets.

Deputy Premier and Minister for Regional and Rural Development Peter Ryan joined Member for Benalla Bill Sykes last week to announce details of the policy.

“From the smallest media outlets to the largest, all play an important role in connecting our local communities and that is better reflected in this new policy,” Mr Ryan said.

“The updated policy, which will take effect on 1 July, requires government advertisers to increase expenditure in regional media outlets from 10 per cent to 15 per cent of their total campaign spend.

“There is an obligation for each government department to report annually on the actual spend in regional media, which will be audited by the Department of Premier and Cabinet. This will ensure small and independent newspapers are included where appropriate.”

Mr Ryan said changes to the demographic profile of the state and developments in technology and new media led the government to conduct a review of the existing policy.

“The policy was informed by analysis with media experts and stakeholders and through consultation with editors and owners of regional media, including at a Regional Communication Forum, held in Moe in December last year,” Mr Ryan said.

“There are no other regional communication policies in existence in Australia. The Coalition Government intends to continue consultation with regional media as part of an ongoing process, to keep regional communities connected and engaged.”

Within Victoria, those in government, advertising and regional media agree with Warren Buffett’s sentiment that there is “no more important institution than the local paper”.

Harold Mitchell certainly does.

“He’s (Mr Buffett) right and also it’s true here. Newsprint is dead? I don’t think so.”